7 Tips to Help You Deal with an Alcoholic Spouse

“Frankly, I was horrified by life, at what a man had to do simply in order to eat, sleep, and keep himself clothed. So, I stayed in bed and drank. When you drank, the world was still out there, but for the moment it didn’t have you by the throat.”

-Charles Bukowski

When someone you love suffers from an addiction, it can tear you apart. What’s more, the mere presence of the addiction completely removes your ability to communicate honestly. In marriage, it’s even worse. There are so many feelings involved, and the people you love have the power to hurt you more than anyone else in your life.

Living with an alcoholic is traumatic. You’re affected from the time you wake up in the morning to the time you go to sleep at night. Still, when you know how to deal with your alcoholic spouse, life can become better. In fact, it can even lead to your spouse getting the help that’s needed to recover. With that in mind, here are seven tips that you must read, review, and remember to help you cope with your alcoholic spouse.

 

1. Remember that alcoholism is a disease

It is very hard to believe that your spouse is no longer making an active choice to drink. However, when someone is an alcoholic, the choice to drink is no longer within their control, at least to some extent. Alcoholism is a disease. And in order to fully understand it, it can be helpful to think of it the way you think of any other disease, such as cancer or heart disease. It is possible to make a choice to recover from alcoholism. But until the individual makes that decision, the disease remains in place.

Approximately 40% of those who enter an alcohol addiction treatment facility opt to begin recovering from alcoholism each year. So, recovery is possible as long as your spouse is willing, and that may eventually be the case, even if it isn’t right now.

 

2. Don’t become angry

Your instinct is to respond to your spouse with anger when you know he or she has been drinking. It becomes tiring to cope with the stress, and at times, it may even become unbearable. Even so, maintain a sense of peace and patience. It may help to find a friend you can vent to about your anger but avoid targeting your spouse with those feelings. It may help to continually remind yourself that what you’re really angry at is the disease, not your spouse.

Remember, a good temper is much more likely to have a positive effect on your spouse in the long run. What you really want to accomplish is recovery from the disease of alcoholism, and maintaining a positive attitude—even if you eventually have to leave your spouse, for one reason or another—is the best way to achieve that.

 

3. Focus on yourself

If you allow it to, your spouse’s alcoholism will take over your life. In fact, in a recent study by the University of Buffalo in New York and supported by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, it was found that 50% of all marriages that involve one alcoholic spouse end in divorce.

There is nothing you can do to change your spouse’s alcoholism. That type of change has to come from within him or her. However, what you can do is make sure you’re taking good care of yourself. Invest in your relationships with other people, with your children, and with your extended family members. Treat yourself to something you enjoy on occasion in order to give yourself a break from the turmoil at home, such as a pedicure or a night out at the movies with friends. Doing these things will give you the stamina and resolve you need during this difficult time.

 

4. Have a simple, honest discussion but do it the right way

It’s good to talk about how your spouse’s alcoholism is affecting you, and even your marriage, but make sure you choose your words carefully. Statements that begin with “You always…” or “You make it hard to…” are only going to make your spouse defensive. Instead, choose “I” statements to convey how you feel, such as, “I’m having a difficult time sleeping at night because of the late nights you’re keeping.” Be gentle, but be firm in your statements. Above all, don’t become angry or accusing.

 

5. Don’t enable your spouse or try to prevent consequences

One of the mistakes many people make is enabling their alcoholic spouses or trying to prevent consequences from occurring. This does nothing to solve the problem, and it only prevents your spouse from experiencing the results of his or her actions, which may eventually lead to recovery.

 

6. Allow your spouse to explain his or her life choices to others.

Your spouse may ask you to lie for him or her or try to cover up a bad choice involving alcohol. Politely decline to do so. Remember that it is not your job to shed a good light on your spouse, and this forces him or her to take responsibility, which may lead to a quicker recovery.

 

7. If your spouse is interested in getting professional help, encourage this to happen quickly

Eventually, your spouse may come to you and express an interest in recovery. This is the time to encourage him or her to do so. You can provide website links or phone numbers to help. It is important to act fast because the determination to get help can fade as quickly as it appeared.

Living with an alcoholic spouse might be one of the biggest challenges you’ve ever undertaken. However, if you’re careful to keep these tips in mind, and you remember that alcoholism is a disease, keep your anger at bay, focus on yourself, discuss the problem calmly, honestly, and rationally, don’t enable, and act quickly when professional help is sought, you’ll find that you can overcome it.

7 Tips to Help You Deal with an Alcoholic Spouse InfographicAre you living with an alcoholic spouse? What tips or advice would you give someone who is going through this experience right now?

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